RE: Preparation Time For Recipes

It takes a lot longer to develop a recipe than it does to replicate a recipe.

For that reason the prep times are not given.

To estimate the time for each procedure after the fact would not be accurate enough for my tastes.

The number of ingredients aren’t necessarily an indicator of preparation time.






 

WATCH YOUR WEIGHT | BE A WORK IN PROGRESS

WATCH YOUR WEIGHT | BE A WORK IN PROGRESS

Too often we set unrealistic short-term goals that should be in the long-term category. We’re always going to start tomorrow or next week and those weeks turn into years, because the job of reaching the goal is overwhelming.

Your weight doesn’t begin and end with a weight goal. Look at yourself like you look at everything else. This needs improvement, something else does, then set about changing what you don’t like by tweaking, instead of overhauling.

Eat a little less to begin.

Start thinking about what your body needs rather than what you think it wants.

Stop thinking that you can never lose that excess weight. You can and will, understanding that you’re the one who controls what you put into your gut.

If you raise children, you don’t start out being the perfect parent. It’s a work in progress as you make adjustments in your approach from day-to-day.

When you go to work, same thing. You adjust to new information, new duties, changes in the job description, new bosses etc.

Do the same with how you approach what’s best for your body. Allow yourself to be that work in progress.

Remember, goals without a plan won’t work. Saying that you’ll do something tomorrow or next week won’t work. Declining the candy bar or super-sized soda pop or second or third helpings of food works in the moment. That’s when you’re plan goes into effect–when you’re faced with a decision to do, or not to do.

Feeding your body the same huge volume even when it’s all good food is not the solution.

Over-stuffing your gut is dangerous no matter what you over-stuff it with. Remember, the gut pushes up against the heart. Push too hard and it restricts the heart’s ability to beat unencumbered. Think of it as blowing up a balloon beyond capacity.

People often end up in the emergency room thinking they’re having a heart attack after they’ve eaten a large meal. The doctor says it’s indigestion, which translates to the lay person as ‘what’ they ate, not that they ate too much. ‘Get rid of the gas’ is the usual prescribed remedy, when actually ‘put your fork down’ should be the primary prescription. Eat less food and you’ll create less gas.

Give your heart a fighting chance. Keep smothering it and eventually when you climb that flight of stairs, when your heart needs to pump harder, your bloated gut will block your heart’s effort to get up those stairs. The heart will circumvent by beating a lot of short beats quickly in order to compensate, then because it’s beating so fast will flip into arrhythmias. Next thing you know you’re in the hospital.

Sure it takes discipline. But you get up everyday don’t you? You shower and dress and go to work and come home and watch T.V. or go back to work a second job. That all takes discipline. So it isn’t that you’re lacking in the discipline department. Eating a mammoth amount of food takes discipline too.

Stop asking other people why you do it. It tastes good, it feels good. No it doesn’t. You feel like hell. Then why do I do it? Ask yourself that question. Nobody knows you like you know yourself. Why do you go to work everyday? Because I have to. Why do you get up everyday? Because I have to. Why do you eat so much? Because I have to. No you don’t. That’s one thing you don’t have to do. Yeah, but I do it anyway. Try doing something you don’t have to do. You just might like that feeling of freedom. Just because you feel enslaved by everything else in your life, doesn’t mean you have to enslave yourself in areas that you have total power over.

Try power on for size. I’ll bet it fits like a glove!

Chef Davies-Tight






CALORIES IN FAT AND SUGAR

I discovered over the years that if I kept in mind the calories in fat and sugar in the foods that I consumed that I was better able to control my weight. Too much fat not good. Too much sugar not good. It’s that simple.

FAT:

Margarine:

1 teaspoon = 34 calories

1 tablespoon = 102 calories

Oil: 

1 teaspoon = 40 calories

1 tablespoon = 119 calories

SUGAR:

White granulated:

1 teaspoon = 15 calories

1 tablespoon = 46 calories

Brown sugar:

1 teaspoon = 17 calories

1 tablespoon = 52 calories

CREATE vs ENGINEER

Create connotes willy-nilly. There’s nothing willy-nilly about my process.

I engineer everything I do – the entire recipe developing process is engineered. I don’t cross my fingers, take a deep breath or hold my breath, pray, hope, wish or hand it over to the universe. I take control at every juncture.

I don’t try something merely to see if it might fly, or just out of curiosity. The world is full of curious-seekers. I’m not one of them. If I’m thinking about it, I already have a pretty good idea whether it will or won’t fly or if it won’t, can I make it fly, and is it worth it? If I’m excited about the possibility I’ll continue. If I’m holding my breath, I won’t.

In the rare instances where I have to make more than one attempt, I do so knowing in advance that I will succeed – eventually. I keep the pace that the project sets for me – not the other way around. I don’t frantically test and retest to get it right. When the skill set matches the mind set and the products are available to make it happen, I’ll be there to make sure it does.

Nobody can tell me to hold up a project for their own self-serving interests. Nobody can tell me to give a project to somebody else whom the world favors more. I don’t have private investors who play all sides of the fence – even the top and the bottom of the fence (put it on hold or sink it parts of the fence).

I’m not a tumbleweed. I don’t go where the wind takes me. I make the wind turn in my direction – because it sees the value in going the way of the Five Principles.

I don’t force it. It wants to be a part of this great project.

If you want to be a part of it all, then you had better show up with some talent and know what those talents are.

You can stay a tumbleweed if you want. But if you want in on this, then you had better talk to that tumble part in you and line up with the Five Principles:

No prejudice, discrimination, enslavement, torture and slaughter.

There’s nothing willy-nilly about me.

Remember that.

Sharon Lee Davies-Tight, the animal-free chef






GARLIC: POWDER vs GRANULATED

GARLIC: POWDER vs GRANULATED

Garlic powder textures like cornstarch. Granulated garlic textures like salt, but doesn’t melt or dissolve. The finer the granulation, the better. Shop around.

Most markets now carry only the granulated, yet label it as garlic powder. Ninety-nine percent of the time I use granulated labeled as powder. I know it’s confusing, but that’s what manufacturers do.

If you shop at a specialty market or wholesale food store, you’ll be able to buy granulated labeled as granulated, and powdered labeled as powder.

If you want extra smooth, then use powder. If it doesn’t matter, then use granulated labeled as powder, or labeled as granulated. The powder is white and the granulated is tan.

* The same is true for onion powder.