SMOKY YAM SOUP

SMOKY YAM SOUP
Creamy yams simmered briefly with tarragon, rosemary and a hint of smoke. I’m making this on the stove as I type and am waiting for a call from the hospital regarding Steve’s surgery. The yams used for this recipe have an American Heart Association recommendation on the can.

Makes 5-1/2 cups

40 oz. can cut yams in syrup

2 c. plain soy milk

3 T. transfat-free margarine

1 t. ground rosemary

1 t. dried tarragon, crushed

liquid smoke to taste, 1-2 t.

1 t. salt

lots of freshly ground black pepper, or to taste

Place one half of cut yams with one half of the liquid (syrup) in food processor and process till smooth. Pour into large saucepan. Process the second half and add to the pot. We divide the processing, because most people have small processing bowls and you don’t want the liquid to burst up out of the unit. I speak from experience. I lost about a quarter cup of liquid trying to do it all at once.

Add remaining ingredients. Stir well with wire whisk to completely incorporate all ingredients.  Cook over medium, low heat, uncovered, at a soft boil for about 15 minutes. Adjust for herbs, and heat till herbs are to your taste.

Remove from heat and either serve up in soup cups or reserve for service later. Because of the richness, cups are better than bowls.

Notes: First of all, this soup is laughingly simple. Yams are cheap and good for you and delicious. They come already sweetened, so there’s no need to add more sugar.

If I were serving this to company, which this soup qualifies for, then I might float a melon baller of chilled margarine and a fresh sprig of rosemary on top of each serving, followed by a sprinkling of freshly ground black pepper.

Since Steve is being intubated for surgery, this will feel soothing on his throat should he want a little something to eat. Vitamin A is good for healing tissues, so it’s just what the doctor would have ordered.

I think it’s great that yams come in a can already peeled, because peeling isn’t much fun.

The smoke adds a rich dimension, and the herbs are more subtle than you’d think. It’s delicious, which means it’s ‘bookable’–my term to remind me the recipe needs no further work.

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